Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley has been selected as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations in President-elect Donald Trump's administration, according to Trump's transition team.

Haley has accepted the position, which requires Senate confirmation.

NPR State Department correspondent Michele Kelemen reports the position was elevated to Cabinet rank by President George W. Bush and that President Barack Obama kept the designation. But Kelemen says the job of U.N. ambassador was not traditionally Cabinet-rank and it's unclear whether Trump will maintain that status.

A suspect is in custody in connection to the ambush-style killings of two police officers in the Des Moines, Iowa, area, according to police.

The two officers were shot and killed early Wednesday as they sat in their squad cars.

"The shootings appear to have been ambush-style attacks," police spokesman Paul Parizek said in a statement.

The suspect in custody is 46-year-old Scott Michael Greene, a white male resident of Urbandale, a Des Moines suburb.

Alaska's Bureau of Land Management regularly posts photos and videos of flying squirrels, scampering porcupines, majestic moose or dramatic landscapes.

But the video that went up last week was different. It was ominous. It was mysterious. It was ... the Chena River Ice Monster, as captured by a baffled BLM employee.

The video shows a strange, undulating icy shape appearing to move through the water. The video has a dramatic soundtrack and an overlay of a camcorder, but BLM insisted the footage itself was unedited.

Updated 11:50 p.m. ET.

The eye of Hurricane Matthew is just off the coast of Georgia, pushing surge flooding into Florida and Georgia, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm's highest sustained winds are 105 mph. The storm is expected to move near or over the coast of South Carolina Saturday.

For those standing on the platform, there was no warning.

But inside the train, in the last few moments, some of the passengers could tell something was wrong.

The commuter train was approaching Hoboken Terminal in New Jersey, a crucial commuter hub for the New York City region, during rush hour Thursday morning. And it was going too fast.

The train smashed into the barriers at the end of the tracks, crashing through them and into the platform. It took out support beams holding up the ceiling of the Beaux-Arts terminal, and the roof began to collapse.

Protests in Charlotte, N.C., continued for a third night — without the violence of earlier demonstrations. Police officers and National Guard troops shared the streets with marchers protesting a fatal police shooting earlier this week.

Jay Price of member station WUNC describes the mood as "mellow," and says that police and protest leaders worked to keep the marchers moving, doing laps of uptown Charlotte.

An explosion in Manhattan has injured at least 29 people, according to officials in New York City. The police and fire departments both report that none of the injuries appear life-threatening.

Mayor Bill de Blasio says initial investigations suggest the explosion, on West 23rd Street in Chelsea, was an "intentional act," but that there is "no evidence at this point" of a connection to terrorism.

Police are also investigating "a second potential device" several blocks away, on West 27th Street, de Blasio says.

The German pharmaceutical and chemical giant Bayer says it will buy U.S. seed seller Monsanto for $66 billion in an all-cash deal that will create the world's largest supplier of seeds and agricultural chemicals.

More Americans are making more money.

The U.S. Census Bureau released new numbers on Tuesday showing that, after a brutal economic recession and years of stagnation, real median household incomes rose from $53,718 in 2014 to $56,516 last year. That's a 5.2 percent rise — the first statistically significant increase since 2007.

But, as NPR's Pam Fessler notes, "the median household income was still lower than it was in 2007."

Samsung Electronics is recalling its brand-new smartphone, the Galaxy Note 7, after dozens of users reported the devices exploded or caught fire.

Samsung traced the problem to a flaw in the phone's lithium battery, and issued a voluntary global recall.

Samsung is offering to replace all 1 million devices already in the hands of consumers in 10 countries, and it's recalling the shipments of the Galaxy Note 7 that have already gone out.

Surrounded by shouting, he's completely silent.

The child is small, alone, covered in blood and dust, dropped in the back of an ambulance with his feet dangling off the edge of a too-big chair.

He doesn't cry or speak. His face is stunned and dazed, but not surprised. He wipes his hand over his wounded face, looks at the blood, wipes it off on the chair.

Updated at 12:15 p.m. ET

Delta flights around the world were delayed this morning because of a "computer outage," the company says.

A power outage in Atlanta around 2:30 a.m. ET was responsible for the problem, the company said in a statement.

After a hot air balloon crash in Texas on Saturday killed all 16 people aboard, revelations about the pilot's past are raising questions about the oversight of balloon operators.

The pilot had drunken driving and drug convictions that would probably have blocked him from getting an airline pilot's license, The Associated Press reports — but there are less stringent licensing requirements for balloon pilots.

A shooting at a shopping mall in Munich has left at least 10 people dead, including the alleged attacker, and at least 27 people injured, the Munich police say.

Munich police chief Hubertus Andrae said at a press conference Saturday that the suspect was an 18-year-old German-Iranian man born and raised in Munich, armed with a handgun.

A search of the suspect's home turned up "no evidence" of links to the Islamic State group.

Investigators say they're looking into the suspect's mental state.

At a beachside restaurant in Nice, France, Eric Drattell and his wife were relaxing after a fireworks show when a white truck began speeding down the seaside promenade, mowing people down.

"You go from having an absolutely marvelous time to sheer terror in a blink of an eye, literally," he says. "It was a spectacular fireworks show. And then all of a sudden this happens and people are screaming."

Hillary Clinton and her staff were "extremely careless" in handling classified data over a private email server while she was secretary of state, FBI Director James Comey said Tuesday — but the FBI is recommending that no charges be brought against her.

At least 42 people died in Tuesday's attack on Ataturk international airport in Istanbul and at least 239 people were injured. At least 13 foreigners or dual citizens are among the dead, the Turkish government says.

The attack was carried out by three suicide bombers armed with guns and explosives, according to authorities.

No group has claimed responsibility for the violence, but Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim says he suspects the Islamic State was behind it.

The Supreme Court has overturned a Texas law requiring clinics that provide abortions to have surgical facilities and doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. The law was predicted to close many clinics and further reduce availability of abortion in Texas; the court has ruled the law violated the Constitution.

Updated at 1:15 p.m.

House Democrats have ended their almost 26-hour-long sit-in to push for gun control legislation, pledging on Thursday afternoon to continue their fight once Congress returns from the July Fourth recess.

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., ended the daylong protest surrounded by his Democratic colleagues. The civil rights leader proclaimed that this "is a struggle, but we're going to win this struggle."

Bretagne, a 16-year-old golden retriever and the last known remaining Sept. 11 search dog, was euthanized Monday in Texas.

Nine soldiers are dead in Fort Hood, Texas, after a tactical vehicle was swept away by a flood-swollen stream late Thursday. Military officials had initially reported five soldiers died in the flooding — but a search for four missing soldiers resulted in the discovery of their bodies Friday.

That information came in an update delivered Friday afternoon; only hours earlier, Maj. Gen. John Uberti had said that while the four soldiers were still missing, finding them remained the top priority.

We've updated this post to reflect the four additional deaths.

Days of flooding in southeastern Texas have reportedly killed at least six people, and more rain is in the forecast.

The Brazos River, which runs 840 miles across much of the state, has already risen to record levels, submerging neighborhoods west of Houston and forcing hundreds of people to evacuate, according to The Associated Press.

The National Weather Service predicts that 4 to 5 more inches of rain are expected around Houston through the weekend.

In already waterlogged areas, just 1 inch would be enough to cause more flooding, the service warned.

Baltimore police Officer Edward Nero has been found not guilty of all four misdemeanor charges he faced in connection with the arrest of Freddie Gray.

Gray died on April 19, 2015, after suffering injuries while in police custody.

Following the ruling, Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement, "This is our American system of justice and police officers must be afforded the same justice system as every other citizen in the city, state, and country."

Updated 5:40 p.m. ET

EgyptAir's Flight MS 804 disappeared during a flight from Paris to Cairo early Thursday morning with 66 people onboard.

At one point it was reported that debris from the plane was found near the island of Karpathos. That finding has been retracted by EgyptAir Vice Chairman Ahmed Adel. "We stand corrected," he told CNN. The wreckage is "not our aircraft."

The Associated Press reports that "as night fell, the searchers had yet to find any confirmed debris."

Emilio Navaira, a legend in the Tejano music scene, has died at 53.

Navaira was found unconscious at his home on Monday night, according to police in New Braunfels, Texas. Police say he appears to have died of natural causes.

Submerged subdivisions, impassable roads, overflowing creeks: For the second day in a row, Houston has been struggling to cope with disastrous flooding.

Nearly 18 inches of rain has fallen on parts of Houston and surrounding areas in the past two days, according to the Harris County Flood Warning System. The resulting floodwaters have reportedly led to the deaths of five people.

In a major document released Friday, Pope Francis addressed divisive elements of Catholic doctrine — including how to treat couples who remarry after a divorce that wasn't annulled by the church, and the church's stance on contraception.

Without issuing any new top-down doctrine, Francis said that priests should focus on providing pastoral care for Catholic couples, rather than sitting in judgment of them, and that individual conscience should be emphasized, rather than dogmatic rules.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says that Americans were among those killed in Tuesday's terrorist attacks in Belgium's capital, which killed at least 31 people and injured hundreds more.

Speaking in Brussels on Friday, Kerry said he was grieving with "the loved ones of those who have been very cruelly taken from us — including Americans."

The director of the State Department Press Office has since specified that two U.S. citizens were killed in the attacks.

It's the first confirmation of American deaths in the attacks.

After 41 days, the Oregon occupation is over: All four militants who remained at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge have surrendered to the FBI.

Previously, on Serial ...

"All this time I thought the courts proved it was Adnan that killed her. I thought he was where he deserved to be. Now I'm not so sure."

That's an email from Asia McClain to host Sarah Koenig, as read on the very first episode of Serial, the podcast sensation produced by the creators of This American Life.

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