Body Cameras

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Austin Police Department is still working out the kinks in its body-camera program, according to a new city audit.

While the implementation of a planned deployment of body cameras on Austin Police Department officers is on hold until at least late November, city leaders and public accountability advocates are still working out the issue of how the city will decide when to release video footage from those cameras for public review.

KUT News

The Austin City Council met Thursday for its final meeting before the July recess. Council met past midnight and into early Friday, passing several measures, including the approval to move forward with a $720-million mobility bond.

ACLU of Washington via Texas Tribune

The Austin Police Department held an AMA (short for Ask Me Anything; it's a Q&A forum) on reddit Friday morning to take questions about officer body cameras. Technology Commander Ely Reyes fielded the questions submitted on the forum, many of which focused on who'd be able to access footage, and how. Redditors also wanted to know more about how the footage would be stored, and how the department planned to insure that officers turned cameras on and off at appropriate times.

Nathan Bernier / KUT

Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo has said he wants body cameras on his officers by the end of this year. While there have been a lot of questions about what happens with these videos once they’re recorded, APD is considering the best possible practices for dealing with the footage.


KUT News

The new City of Austin budget includes money for the Austin Police Department to outfit its officers with body cameras. The City Council Public Safety committee held a meeting last night to begin figuring out the best ways to use those cameras.

KUT News

Part of the city of Austin’s new budget includes $3 million to equip Austin Police officers with body cameras. As for how that money will be spent, buying the body cameras themselves is just one part of the equation.

“The biggest investment in body cameras is not the camera itself,” Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo says.