Prescription Drugs

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Two Texas doctors are suing the state over a law prohibiting them from selling prescription drugs to their patients.

Medication bottles
Alan Levine/Flickr (CC0 1.0)

From Texas Standard:

Americans pay some of the highest prices in the developed world for prescription medication: On average, each individual spends $1,200 per year. But now, some states are trying to change that. On Wednesday, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis signed into law a bill that would implement a price cap on insulin, the first law of its kind in the nation.

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From Texas Standard:

The Trump administration finalized a rule last week that aims to curb the rising cost of prescription drugs. Pharmaceutical companies will have to stipulate the list price of a drug in a TV ad if a month's supply of that drug costs more than $35. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says the rule, which encourages drug companies to be more transparent about their prices, should ultimately benefit consumers.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The opioid epidemic killed more than 1,300 Texans in 2016. The next year, state lawmakers passed legislation to mandate a prescription-monitoring program that requires medical providers to check a patient’s health records before prescribing opioids. The mandate is supposed to take effect in September, but the program may be delayed at the request of doctors.

Spencer Selvidge / KUT News

From Texas Standard:

As Senate Republican leaders reveal another version of their plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, taking politics out of the health care picture may be just the medicine needed. Political noise aside, the fact remains that health care costs are still too high, and many individuals can’t afford coverage. Experts say the political debate is essentially moot until the financial barriers to care are sorted out.

AnToonz/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard:

It all started with a battle over information: In one corner was the Texas Health and Human Services Commission. In the other were Texas lawmakers.

The commission holds the details of the state’s Medicaid contracts with large pharmaceutical companies, which show how much the state is spending on medicine. The commission assured lawmakers the state is getting a good deal, but the legislators wanted to see for themselves. In particular, they wanted to know the amount the state was getting back in rebates for name-brand medicine.