E-Cigarettes

Updated 6:14 p.m. ET

The Trump administration announced it will crack down on certain vaping products containing fruit, mint and other e-cigarette flavors to keep them away from kids. Manufacturers will have 30 days to take these products off the market before the Food and Drug Administration can take enforcement action.

Thomas Williams-Platt in the backyard of his aunt's home in Georgetown.
Angela Piazza for The Texas Tribune

Before entering the halls of Channing School high atop the Texas Panhandle last year, students were required to roll up their shirt sleeves to show they weren’t sneaking in e-cigarettes.

Shutterstock

From Texas Standard:

This week, Texas Health and Human Services reported a record number of people with lung disease linked to vaping. One of those people has died; many of them are young – an average of 22 years old. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also recently released a report saying that more than 6 million American teens use tobacco products, the majority of those products being e-cigarettes. But health experts are still trying to determine which vaping products are causing illness. In the meantime,  health officials recommend that Texans stop using e-cigarette products altogether.

Vaping360.com/Flickr

The unregulated marketing of e-cigarettes is increasing the number of young people who vape, according to a new study from researchers at UT Austin. 

Jimmy Maas/KUT

Austin Texas has been home to championship teams from football to volleyball, along with individual title winners in tennis and golf. But there's a new sport taking hold here and across the country, and already there’s a controversy overshadowing it.

Over the weekend, at a strip mall on Airport Boulevard champions were crowned.