Media

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with retired television journalist Bernard Shaw.

Shaw covered many monumental 20th century events, from the Jonestown tragedy to Tienanmen Square. He helped launch news network CNN as its chief anchor.

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From Texas Standard:

The changing news landscape has been a struggle for many local papers. The Associated Press cites a study that found some 1,800 newspapers have shut down in just the last 15 years. Many of those were community weeklies.

That's bad news for the newspaper industry, but Texas A&M professor Johanna Dunaway says it's also impacting our politics. She co-authored a study in the Journal of Communication that found newspaper closures polarize voting behavior, as evidenced by a decline in split-ticket voting.

From Texas Standard.

When Jessica McClure, an 18-month-old girl in Midland, was stuck in a well for 58 hours in October of 1987, CNN carried most of the rescue effort live. There was an international sigh of relief when a crew of roughnecks and first responders finally brought Baby Jessica to the surface.

Aidan Wakely-Mulroney/Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

Headlines of the past few days have heralded the potential consequences of the impending decision by a federal district judge on whether Texas-based AT&T can merge with Time Warner. Business writers say the decision will determine whether old-line media companies will have the tools to compete with tech and entertainment companies in the future, or whether those media companies will lose out, as tech giants and makers of entertainment go around the older firms to sell to viewers. And entertainment consumers will be affected too, if fewer companies consolidate to control both the means of accessing content, and the content itself.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

What kind of job did the media do covering the Austin serial bombings earlier this year? That depends on which media you are talking about.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News

From Texas Standard:

As local newspapers continue to die out, the communities they used to serve have come to be known as “news deserts.” But the changing media landscape doesn't only affect the communities where they were. One unintended consequence of news deserts is their impact on disease research.

Dr. David Scales of Harvard Medical School says as local news outlets die information on the spread of infectious diseases becomes harder to come by.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Morning Edition host Jennifer Stayton met with students in the journalism program at Reagan Early College High School in Austin this week. Hear what they had to say about the state of journalism today:


MSNBC

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Yvette M. Miley, senior vice president for MSNBC & NBC News, and the 2017 recipient of the Chuck Stone Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Association of Black Journalists.

Miley talks about the importance of people of color in decision-making positions in the newsroom, her journey from a volunteer position at the Florida Photo News to NBC and the symbolic importance of the Chuck Stone Award.

USA Today Sports

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. concludes his conversation with Jarrett Bell, NFL columnist with USA Today Sports and a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame selection committee, about becoming a sports reporter, the National Football League and Colin Kaepernick

USA Today Sports

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Jarrett Bell, NFL columnist with USA Today and a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame selection committee, about becoming a sports reporter, the National Football League and the controversy surrounding former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick

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On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with radio and television veteran Donnie Simpson about growing up in Detroit, becoming a DJ at the age of 15 and being a part of cable television history at the launch of BET.

Mladen Antonov / AFP/Getty Images

As Americans prepare to celebrate the country's 241st birthday, they believe the overall tone and level of civility between Democrats and Republicans in the nation's capital has gotten worse since the election of President Trump last year, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. The same survey also shows distrust of many of the nation's fundamental democratic institutions amongst the public.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Merri Dee, legendary television and radio personality, and author of Life Lessons on Faith, Forgiveness & Grace.

As a trailblazer in both radio and television, Dee has served as a newscaster, talk-show host and staff announcer. Later she served as director of community relations at WGN-TV and as adviser to other Tribune-owned TV stations.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Jeff Ballou, Al Jazeera Media Network News editor, and the 110th president of the National Press Club.

Ballou is the first African American man to hold the position, and will mark the first time someone from a non-U.S. and non-Western-based television network has been elected president of the National Press Club.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Meaghan “Meag” Taylor, on-air radio personality and assistant program director with WTUG and founder of ‘Women In Radio.'

‘Women In Radio’, is a community for women in radio who are shaping the culture. Taylor hopes the organization can shed light on all the amazing things women around the world are doing in radio.

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From Texas Standard:

"Journalism in the age of Trump" is more than just a very popular title right now for academic symposia. The media industry has been doing a lot of self-examination under a new presidential administration that's changing the rules of engagement.

Since 1926, Americans have recognized black history annually – first as Negro History Week and later as Black History Month. What you might not know is that black history had barely begun to be studied – or even documented – when the tradition began. Although African-Americans have been in this country since colonial times, it was not until the 20th century that they gained a somewhat respectable presence in history books.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. concludes his conversation with Joe Madison, “The Black Eagle”, the award-winning national talk show host on SiriusXM Urban View radio.

Madison is on the case daily talking about politics and social activism, while challenging the status quo ensuring that people of color are not undervalued, underestimated, or marginalized. He has been named one of Talker Magazine’s 10 Most Important Radio Talk Show Hosts in America for eleven consecutive years.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Joe Madison, “The Black Eagle”, the award-winning national talk show host on SiriusXM Urban View radio.

Madison is on the case daily talking about politics and social activism, while challenging the status quo ensuring that people of color are not undervalued, underestimated, or marginalized. He has been named one of Talker Magazine’s 10 Most Important Radio Talk Show Hosts in America for eleven consecutive years.

Beth Cortez-Neavel/Texas Standard

From Texas Standard:

The day after Donald Trump was elected president, Nov. 9, a Twitter user posted a picture of a few charter buses in downtown Austin, along with a now-deleted message: "Anti-Trump protestors in Austin today are not as organic as they seem. Here are the buses they came in. #fakeprotests #trump2016 #austin."

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From Texas Standard:

If you're a news junkie, it might seem like the presidential election was the only thing worth covering for the past 18 months. But plenty of stories went under- or unreported. What stories have flown under the radar while the nation recoiled at this year's campaign outrages and sat riveted to the horse race?

David Uberti, staff writer at the Columbia Journalism Review, says the way news is distributed puts much of the coverage power in the hands of the news consumer.


On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Michael Gibson co-founder and chairman of Clear View Group, LLC, an African American investment firm based in Austin, TX, the new owners of Ebony Magazine and JETMag.com; and Lynn Norment, former senior writer and managing editor with Ebony Magazine.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Shanté Bacon, Founder and CEO of 135th Street Agency, a strategic communications and experiential marketing firm that specializes in campaigns reaching the youth consumer and business professional. They translate brand messages in a culturally-savvy yet socially responsible manner, while our experiential arm designs customer experiences that enhance the consumer's relationship with the brand.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Merri Dee, legendary television and radio personality, and author of ‘Life Lessons on Faith, Forgiveness & Grace.’

As a trailblazer in both radio and television, Dee has served as a newscaster, talk-show host, and staff announcer. Later she served as Director of Community Relations at superstation WGN-TV and as advisor to other Tribune owned TV stations.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Michel Martin, weekend host of NPR’s All Things Considered.

In 2006 Martin came to NPR and launched Tell Me More, a one-hour daily NPR news and talk show that aired on NPR stations nationwide from 2007-2014 and dipped into thousands of important conversations taking place in the corridors of power, but also in houses of worship, and barber shops and beauty shops, at PTA meetings, town halls, and at the kitchen table.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. concludes his conversation with Dr. Gayle Wald, Professor of English and American Studies at George Washington University and author of ‘It’s Been Beautiful’: Soul! and Black Power Television.

‘Soul!’ on Public Television from 1968 to 1973, was the only national TV show dedicated to cultural and political expressions of Black Power.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Gayle Wald, Professor of English and American Studies at George Washington University and author of ‘It’s Been Beautiful’: Soul! and Black Power Television.

‘Soul!’ on Public Television from 1968 to 1973, was the only national TV show dedicated to cultural and political expressions of Black Power.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Dr. Darrell M. Newton, Associate Dean and Professor in the Fulton School of Liberal Arts, Salisbury University.

Since 1979, Newton has been working in higher education. He also teaches media and cultural studies, film, broadcast writing and international media as a full professor in the Communication Arts department.

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the late Robert C. Maynard, journalist, newspaper publisher, editor and former owner of the Oakland Tribune newspaper.

Maynard was a charismatic leader who changed the face of American journalism, built a four-decade career on the cornerstones of editorial integrity, community involvement, improved education and the importance of the family.

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