Veterinary Medicine

A Mysterious Virus Is Killing Texas Rabbits

May 8, 2020
Jim Harper/Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.5)

From Texas Standard:

 

A couple of months ago, 30 dead rabbits were found near Fort Bliss.

 

That's when Ken Waldrup, who works for the Texas Department of State Health Services, as a regional zoonosis control veterinarian in El Paso, where Fort Bliss is located, got a call.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Almost 60 horses have been released from a two-week quarantine in Bastrop County after an outbreak of vesicular stomatitis virus, or VSV, according to the Texas Animal Health Commission.

Jos @ FPS-Groningen/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard.

Texas is becoming increasingly urban, but lots of folks still live in the vast rural swathes of the state, as do their animals. That’s why it’s a problem that there’s a big shortage of veterinarians, who want to practice away from the big cities. The solution seemed simple to Texas Tech University – just open a new veterinary school in the Panhandle to get more people trained.

Army Medicine/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

From Texas Standard

Three of nine Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners officials resigned Thursday after Texas' review board of state agencies issued a scathing report detailing problems with the board.

 

On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with the late Dr. Alfred Nelson Poindexter Jr., Prairie View A&M University professor emeritus and veterinarian. Dr. Poindexter, or “Doc” as his friends, colleagues and students affectionately called him began teaching animal science and practicing veterinary medicine at Prairie View A&M University in 1945, when he was 24 years old. He remained at PV for more than 50 years until his retirement in August 2004.