Audrey McGlinchy | KUT

City Hall Reporter

Credit Martin do Nascimento / KUT
Audrey McGlinchy is the City Hall reporter at KUT, covering the Austin City Council and the policies they discuss. She comes to Texas from Brooklyn, where she tried her hand at publishing, public relations and nannying. Audrey holds English and journalism degrees from Wesleyan University and the City University of New York. She got her start in journalism as an intern at KUT Radio during a summer break from graduate school. While completing her master's degree in New York City, she interned at the New York Times Magazine and Guernica Magazine.

Ways to Connect

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Under a $4.1 billion budget proposed today by City Manager Spencer Cronk, Austin homeowners would pay roughly $78 more a year in property taxes and fees to the city.

Martin do Nascimento for KUT

Austin Mayor Steve Adler wants the city to scrap CodeNEXT and start over. 

In a post to the Austin City Council message board Wednesday, Adler asked that the city manager come up with a new process for updating the city’s 34-year-old land-use code. The mayor bemoaned “misinformation” surrounding the yearslong discussion.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

For 68 years, drivers on Colorado Street in downtown Austin could go only one way: south.

But as of today, that one-directional road officially goes two ways for cars. It’s the hip thing to do.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin has endured several legal jabs from the state in the past couple months.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

The Austin City Council’s lone conservative, Ellen Troxclair, announced today that she will not run for re-election for her District 8 seat in November.

Troxclair, who represents Southwest Austin, called the decision not to run an “incredibly difficult one.”

In an emailed statement, Troxclair said she was proud to have served as "a voice of reason" and "a fiscal watchdog" on the Council and said the city's taxation and regulation had led it down an "unsustainable path."

Callie Hernandez for KUT

Austin City Council members have outlined a $925 million bond to pay for items such as affordable housing, park updates and road repairs that will be put to voters in November. The bond could be paid for, in part, by raising the property tax rate.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Austin City Council members voted Thursday to ask the city manager to look into creating a new department to oversee its labor rights laws – including rules that guarantee rest breaks for construction workers and mandate paid sick leave for private employees.

Callie Hernandez for KUT

Three women have sued the City of Austin and Travis County, alleging their sexual assault cases were inadequately handled because of their gender. The class-action lawsuit claims that sexual assault survivors “have been denied equal access to justice and equal protection of the law.”

Nathan Bernier / KUT

If an Austin police officer stops someone for a nonviolent misdemeanor – such as possessing a small amount of marijuana or driving without a valid license – the officer has a choice: issue a citation or arrest the person. Simply put, the officer has discretion.

Austin City Council members voted 9-0 (two council members were not present) Thursday to do away with some of this discretion. Proponents cited police data that show black and Hispanic people stopped for low-level offenses are more likely than white people to be arrested than cited.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Austin City Council unanimously confirmed Brian Manley as the Austin Police Department's new chief Thursday. Manley has served in an interim role since former Police Chief Art Acevedo left to head up Houston’s police department in 2016.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The race to fill the District 1 seat in November is wide open after Austin City Council Member Ora Houston announced today she would not seek re-election.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

After roughly a month of collecting public feedback, City Manager Spencer Cronk has nominated interim Austin Police Chief Brian Manley to head the department permanently. The appointment requires a City Council vote; members are scheduled to discuss it Thursday.

Martin do Nascimento / KUT

Austin City Council members have voted against putting a CodeNEXT petition to a public vote, instead allowing a threatened lawsuit to proceed and a judge to determine whether the city is required to do so.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

At the end of Colorado Street on the north bank of Lady Bird Lake stands a six-story brick tower.

Julia Reihs / KUT

Part 3 of a three-part series

A driver hit and killed Judy Romano’s son, Barry Friedman, while he was walking in Austin two years ago.

According to the police report, Friedman tried to cross E. Parmer Lane just before 6 a.m. on July 9, 2016. The driver said Friedman was in the crosswalk even though he didn't have the light to cross. 

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Part 2 of a three-part series

Mike Villegas was doing work around the house with his 12-year-old son on Christmas Eve 2016 when he noticed a police car parked outside.

“I knew immediately that this was not going to be good,” he said.

Julia Reihs / KUT

Part 1 of a three-part series

Fourteen-year-old Alexei Bauereis had quit the backyard stunts like jumping from trees onto roofs and downhill skateboarding that defined his childhood. He was saving his legs for ballet.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

A week ago interim Austin Police Chief Brian Manley was tapped by City Manager Spencer Cronk as the sole finalist to be the city’s new permanent police chief, and now Cronk and the city are engaged in a public input process before possibly bringing on Manley full-time.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

Austin City Council members early this morning did not accept the changes asked for in a citizen-led petition that would have required all comprehensive zoning changes, including CodeNEXT, be put to a public vote. Now council must decide before Aug. 20 whether to put the petition on a November ballot.

Gabriel C. Pérez

Austin voters now have a clearer roadmap for a slate of bond-funded projects intended to relieve congestion and improve city infrastructure on a massive scale.

With little more than a guarantee from the Austin City Council, voters overwhelmingly approved a $720-million mobility-focused bond in 2016. Council voted Thursday to approve a construction plan for some of those projects, which will build out new bike lanes, sidewalks and road redesigns.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

This post has been updated.

The Austin City Council voted unanimously Thursday to rename two streets that had been named for Confederate figures.

Robert E. Lee Road will become Azie Morton Road, after the Austin resident and first African-American U.S. treasurer. Jeff Davis Avenue will be renamed for William Holland, who was born into slavery and became a Travis County commissioner in the late 19th century. He was integral in establishing a school in Austin for disabled children of color.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

An Austin-based conservative think tank has sued the city over its paid sick leave ordinance. The ordinance, which goes into effect Oct. 1, requires all private businesses to provide anywhere from six to eight paid sick days for employees.

Montinique Monroe for KUT

A petition to put rewrites of Austin’s land development code, including CodeNEXT, to a public vote was deemed valid by the City Clerk on Monday.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

When Lewis Conway Jr. was released from prison in 2000 after serving time for manslaughter, the state required him to wear an electronic monitoring device. But nothing fit his ankles.

“So they put the electronic monitor on my wrist,” said Conway, who works on criminal justice issues for the nonprofit Grassroots Leadership. “It was about the size of a baby car on my wrist.”

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Jumping the gun works, it seems.

While city staff were devising a pilot program to govern dockless bikes and scooters, expecting to bring a proposal to council members in June, two companies dropped their electric scooters throughout the city. Now the Austin Transportation Department has proposed fast-tracking approval of the pilot program.

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

It’s been a year of firsts for Stephanie Culver and Jonathan Brou.

In December, the couple bought their first home in Manor, 15 miles from downtown Austin.

“We couldn’t afford Austin to be honest with you,” said Culver, who bought the home with her boyfriend for about $207,000. “This was in our price range.”

Gabriel C. Pérez

Austin Public Health has released an interactive map showing child care and pre-K facilities throughout Travis County, and indicating which centers have received certain national or state accreditation.  

Council Member Delia Garza said where child care centers are located in the city affects everyone – not just those with young children.

Audrey McGlinchy / KUT

Activists filed a petition with the City Clerk on Thursday in an effort to put all land development code rewrites, including CodeNEXT, to a public vote.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

When Natalie Rogers defines the word "terrorist," she starts with the root.

“It is someone who is trying to invoke terror,” said Rogers, a 36-year-old software engineer in Austin.

To some residents, the serial bomber successfully did that.

Courtesy of Tiffany Clay

Anthony Stephan House, who was killed March 2 in the first of a series of bombings in Austin, was a father and a graduate of Texas State University. According to high school friends, he was quiet, humble and self-assured, even at a young age.

“It was always a no-small-talk-type conversation with him,” said high school friend Kevin Cotton, who now lives in Fort Worth. “I liked that about him.”

Pages