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Hochberg, House Public Ed Expert, Won't Run Again

State Rep. Scott Hochberg, D-Houston, speaks to the press about two school finance measures filed on March 8, 2011
Photo by Bob Daemmrich, Texas Tribune
State Rep. Scott Hochberg, D-Houston, speaks to the press about two school finance measures filed on March 8, 2011

The Legislature's foremost expert on school finance and one of its top public education advocates, state Rep. Scott Hochberg, D-Houston, confirmed this afternoon that he won't seek re-election next year.

Hochberg, who took office in 1993 and is now the vice chairman of the House Education Committee and the chairman of the education subcommittee on the House Appropriations Committee, said the time had come for him to pursue something new.

"Being in this job and trying to do it well is a continual thing, as any member will tell you, after a certain amount of time, I think the grind just wears people down," he said, "I love working on all the problems we work on, but it's 24/7 and it makes it hard to focus on anything in specific." He brushed off any suggestion that his absence would leave an void of leadership on school finance issues.

"Nobody's indispensable," he said. "The state survived a lot of years before I was in the Legislature, and will continue to after I'm not."

His announcement comes as a new round of school finance lawsuits enters the courts. The issue will almost certainly be under discussion during the 2013 legislative session.

When asked about his future plans, Hochberg said he did not have a job offer — nor was he soliciting one, saying that he still had a year to serve out of his term.

But he did jokingly reference his reputation as a sometimes fierce presence on the House floor and in committee meetings: "I hear 60 Minutes is looking for a curmudgeon to come up and complain about things on a weekly basis, so maybe that's something I have the talent of doing."

 

Ross Ramsey is managing editor of The Texas Tribune and continues as editor of Texas Weekly, the premier newsletter on government and politics in the Lone Star State, a role he's had since September 1998. Texas Weekly was a print-only journal when he took the reins in 1998; he switched it to a subscription-based, internet-only journal by the end of 2004 without a significant loss in subscribers. As Texas Weekly's primary writer for 11 years, he turned out roughly 2 million words in more than 500 editions, added an online library of resources and documents and items of interest to insiders, and a daily news clipping service that links to stories from papers across Texas. Before joining Texas Weekly in September 1998, Ramsey was associate deputy comptroller for policy with the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts, also working as the agency's director of communications. Prior to that 28-month stint in government, Ramsey spent 17 years in journalism, reporting for the Houston Chronicle from its Austin bureau and for the Dallas Times Herald, first on the business desk in Dallas and later as the paper's Austin bureau chief. Prior to that, as a Dallas-based freelance business writer, he wrote for regional and national magazines and newspapers. Ramsey got his start in journalism in broadcasting, working for almost seven years covering news for radio stations in Denton and Dallas.
Morgan Smith was an editorial intern and columnist at Slate in Washington, D.C., before moving to Austin to enter law school at the University of Texas in 2008. (She has put her degree on hold to join the Tribune's staff.) A native of San Antonio, she has a bachelor's degree in English from Wellesley College.
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