School Shootings

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

The number of Texas school districts with policies allowing teachers and other staff to carry guns has increased almost 50 percent since a gunman killed 10 people at Santa Fe High School in May.

The School Shootings That Weren't

Aug 28, 2018
LA Johnson / NPR

How many times per year does a gun go off in an American school?

We should know. But we don't.

This spring the U.S. Education Department reported that in the 2015-2016 school year, "nearly 240 schools ... reported at least 1 incident involving a school-related shooting." The number is far higher than most other estimates.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The number of students in Texas accused of making terroristic threats or exhibiting a firearm increased significantly in the first five months of 2018 compared with last year, according to a new report from Texas Appleseed.

The report's co-author, Morgan Craven, director of the nonprofit's School-to-Prison Pipeline Project, said there was a large spike in February after the school shooting in Parkland, Fla. While some of those threats were real, she said, legal action in other cases was too extreme.

Lynda Gonzalez for KUT

State representatives on Monday will begin discussing whether a "red flag" law giving courts the ability to remove guns from a person considered dangerous would work in Texas.

John Jordan / The Texas Tribune

A new mobile app launched after a southeast Texas high school shooting last month will allow Texans to report on suspicious activity happening in their own communities and schools. 

Eleven days after the shooting that killed eight students and two teachers in a small Texas town, classes are back in session at Santa Fe High School.

Students from the neighboring Alvin school district arrived on school buses today holding signs of support. Others from the community lined the highway to the school.

Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT News

From Texas Standard.

Following the May 18 mass shooting at Santa Fe High School – and the Sutherland Springs church shooting in November, and the February school shooting in Parkland, Florida – Gov. Greg Abbott convened roundtable discussions about gun violence at the Capitol this week.

Laura Isensee / Houston Public Media

Several hundred people gathered Wednesday night at the Santa Fe Junior High School football stadium to grieve and try to understand the school shooting that killed eight students and two teachers last week.

A group of local pastors organized the service, which they called a “night of hope and healing.”

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott today convened the first of three roundtable discussions on "school and community safety" in response to Friday's school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas.

Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott started a series of roundtable discussions today, aimed at coming up with ways to address school shootings.

Three days after a shooting at a Texas high school took the lives of eight students and two teachers, a town and a country are trying to figure out what comes next.

Gov. Greg Abbott called for a moment of silence across Texas at 10 a.m. local time, to honor the memory of those who died in Friday's violence in the city of 12,000 between Houston and Galveston.

Sunday morning, people in Santa Fe, Texas, flocked to local churches, seeking comfort after this week's high school shooting that killed 10 people and injured 13 others.

The residents of this deeply-religious community are just starting to process their emotions, as they also look for answers as to how such a thing could happen.

"Lord I need you, oh I need you," sang the choir at Arcadia First Baptist Church. It was the refrain of many who are turning to faith to deal with the grim reality that this familiar, and tragic, American routine has now come to their town.

Michael Stravato for The Texas Tribune

In the hours after a deadly shooting at a southeast Texas high school left at least 10 dead and 10 more wounded, a familiar debate began to emerge — pitting the state’s top Republican leaders against some of the Democrats vying to take their spots in this year’s elections.

At least 10 people are dead today after a gunman opened fire at a high school in Santa Fe, Texas. Witnesses say the gunman entered Santa Fe High School shortly before 8 a.m. and opened fire with a shotgun, killing multiple students. A student resource officer responding to the shooter was also seriously injured.

Officials found explosive devices on-campus and off-campus as well. Those devices were rendered safe by police.

Gov. Greg Abbott and other officials held a briefing at 1 p.m. today. Watch a livestream of the news conference below, courtesy of PBS Newshour.

Updated at 10:45 p.m. ET

At least 10 people were killed when a gunman opened fire inside a small-town Texas high school, in what Gov. Greg Abbott called "probably the worst disaster ever to strike this community."

Ten others were wounded in the morning attack at Santa Fe High School.

Austin Price for KUT

A couple dozen Austin students held a town hall meeting with local lawmakers at William B. Travis High School on Sunday to discuss ways to reduce gun violence – particularly at schools.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

After the Columbine school shooting in 1999, the Texas Legislature created the School Safety Center, a research center at Texas State University that helps schools prepare for different kinds of disasters.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT

From Texas Standard.

Schools have been top of mind recently, especially when it comes to safety. Staff at Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland, Florida are returning to their campus today to prepare to restart a school year that was interrupted by the shooting that left 17 people dead on February 14.

Austin Price for KUT

Three of the deadliest mass shootings in modern U.S. history have happened in the last five months. The most recent was just last week, when a gunman opened fire at a high school in Parkland, Fla.

Seventeen people were killed.

It’s easy to feel helpless in a situation like this, but one pre-med student at UT Austin says there is something people can do, and she’s making it her mission to train everyone on campus.

Updated at 9:30 a.m. ET

President Trump is facing calls to act in the wake of the latest mass shooting, which killed 17 people Wednesday at a high school in Florida, and the White House is not ignoring them. The president will participate in a pair of listening sessions on school safety this week, and on Monday morning the White House said he supports efforts to improve the federal background check system, something Congress has expressed broad support for without acting on after past shootings.

Updated at 10 p.m. ET

The Broward, Fla., sheriff said 17 people are dead in the Wednesday shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in the city of Parkland, northwest of Fort Lauderdale. He said a suspect is in custody.

In news conferences after the incident, Sheriff Scott Israel said 12 of the people who died were found inside the school building and two were found just outside. Another victim was on the street, and two people died at the hospital.