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AM Update: Central Texas Flood Watch, Sheriff Race Centers on Immigration, Lege Revisits Medicaid

Storm watch.JPG
Photo Courtesy of National Weather Service
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South-Central Texas can expect storms in the area, beginning Monday night until Tuesday afternoon.

South-Central Texas Flood Watch

The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch for South-Central Texas, beginning today and lasting into Tuesday evening.

The flash flood impact should be highest overnight tonight into Tuesday morning. According to the advisory, average rainfall is estimated between one and two inches, with higher totals reaching into three to five inches.

“A flash flood watch is in effect for Monday evening through Tuesday afternoon for the area North and West and I-35 and HWY 90. There is a chance for locally heavy rain and flash flooding Thursday and Friday. Otherwise no hazardous weather is expected at this time.”

The watch includes Hays, Travis and Williamson counties.

Currently, there is a 50 percent chance of rain tonight and 60 percent for Tuesday night.

Immigration Key Issue in Travis County Sheriff's Race

A controversial immigration program is at the center of the upcoming elections for Travis County Sheriff, according to an article by the Texas Tribune.

“The program, administered by Immigration and Customs Enforcement and in place statewide, compares the fingerprints of arrested individuals to a federal database to determine whether those individuals are eligible for deportation. If a person is found to be in violation, ICE requests that a detainer be placed on the individual for 48 hours, excluding weekends and holidays.”

Democratic candidate John Sisson, who is looking to unseat incumbent Greg Hamilton, is opposed to the program. Sisson tells the Tribune that Hamilton has granted detainers on every immigrant booked. But Hamilton says he’s just following the law.

Read the complete article here.

Lege Looks at Medicaid Trends

Texas lawmakers will hear from experts today on Medicaid.

The House Committee on Appropriations will look at several Medicaid trends, including changes in the ways hospitals are reimbursed. The committee will also examine how cost-saving initiatives are working.

Last year, lawmakers cut $4.8 billion from their estimates of what Medicaid would cost Texas. They hoped the cost would drop because of changes in law, and lessened dependency on the program due to economic recovery – assumptions the committee will be revisiting. 

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