The Big Flip

In this series, we explore the possibility of a seismic shift taking place in Texas politics this year. Democrats say they are just nine seats away from taking control of the Texas House. If they win those seats, the GOP trifecta in Texas – control of the governor’s office, the state Senate and the state House – would be broken. 

We'll talk about how we got here, as well as what a Democratic flip means for Texans, the state Legislature and our political future. 

A voter leaves Ben Hur Shrine after casting a ballot during the primary runoff elections in July.
Michael Minasi / KUT

Part four in a four-part series on the 2020 fight for control of the Texas House

KUT’s Ashley Lopez explains why it’s hard to predict whether Democrats will succeed in flipping the Texas House. Like everything else, the pandemic has complicated things. Changes to voting have made it hard to predict how people will vote – or if they will vote at all. 

A map of congressional districts in Austin showing most are red and represented by Republicans.
Hazel O'Neil for KUT

Part three in a four-part series on the 2020 fight for control of the Texas House

KUT’s Mose Buchele explains what a Democratic-controlled Texas House next year could mean for who represents you for the next 10 years. Because next year is a redistricting year, a Democratic takeover of the House means Democrats would be able to help shape the political future of the state by having a seat at the table as political boundaries are drawn for the next decade.

A screenshot from a 2010 Rick Perry re-election campaign ad.
Screenshot via YouTube

Part two in a four-part series on the 2020 fight for control of the Texas House

KUT’s Jimmy Maas explains how Republicans ruled over a growing economy for two decades. The state managed to weather a global financial crisis and become a hotspot for the tech industry. And, Maas says, that “Texas miracle” actually created the political reality Republicans face now.

The Texas House of Representatives
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Part one in a four-part series on the 2020 fight for control of the Texas House

KUT’s Andrew Weber discusses the recent history of Texas politics — and what happened the last time control of state government started to shift from one party to another.