Matt Largey | KUT

Projects Editor

Matt Largey is the Projects Editor at KUT. He previously worked at WBUR in Boston. His work has appeared on many national radio shows. He's won numerous awards for his reporting, including a national Edward R. Murrow award in 2013. He’s originally from Maine, but has lived in Austin since 2006. While it might sound hard to believe, he thinks Maine and Texas are remarkably similar.

Ways to Connect

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Friends: Last year, our ATXplained project brought seven brand-new stories based on your questions to the stage.

The Crestview neighborhood
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

A state appeals court has declared some elements of Austin's rules governing short-term rentals unconstitutional, including provisions banning non-owner-occupied rentals and occupancy limits.

Defense Distributed had been in a years-long legal battle in federal court in Austin over the legality of publishing the plans online.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

A federal judge in Washington state is overturning a settlement between the federal government and Austin-based Defense Distributed that allowed the company to publish plans for 3D-printable guns online last year. 

Nathan Bernier / KUT

Many Central Texas school districts have announced delayed openings this morning, as temperatures dip below freezing and ice has been reported on some roadways in the Austin area.

Georgetown resident Kalena Powell has our final Library Love Story.
Julia Reihs / KUT

Libraries can be many things. A place of learning. Of relaxation. Of belonging.

We teamed up with Austin's Library Foundation to collect people's stories about what libraries mean to them for a series called Library Love Stories.

In our last story, Kalena Powell tells the story of finding support throughout her life at her local library.

For Pat Sartor, the public library is a place of 'belonging'.
Julia Reihs / KUT

Earlier this year, KUT partnered with Austin's Library Foundation to gather your stories about what the public library means to you. We selected a few of the writers to come record their essays at KUT.

Today, we hear from Austinite Pat Sartor.

If you've ever thought you would have better answers than your elected leaders, here's your chance to prove it. 

KUT and the Austin Monitor are pitting a group of City Council members against their fellow Austinites in a test of knowledge starting at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 20, at the North Door on Brushy Street.

We'll also watch the Democratic presidential debate after trivia — so join us for drinks, trivia and debate watching!

RSVP here.

Richard Tuttle, a longtime school crossing guard in Southeast Austin, died last week.
Lynda M. González / KUT

At the intersection of Palo Blanco and Pleasant Valley, near Mendez Middle School, there’s a makeshift memorial: Signs, balloons, candles and handwritten notes have been hung to pay homage to the man who guided school kids to safety at that intersection for the past 15 years.

Sarah Ruttan is a teacher in Austin and a mom of two.
Julia Reihs / KUT

A while ago, we teamed up with Austin’s Library Foundation to collect stories about what your public library means to you.

The next Democratic presidential debate is coming up on Nov. 20. Nine candidates have qualified so far. 

Zenobia Orimoloye wrote about finding a passion for writing at the Austin Public Library for our Library Love Stories project.
Julia Reihs / KUT

A while ago, we teamed up with Austin’s Library Foundation to collect stories about what your public library means to you. 

Julia Reihs / KUT

What do libraries mean to you? Are they places of learning or imagination? Or maybe a place of belonging? 

We partnered with Austin’s Library Foundation to collect your stories about what libraries mean to you. 

Today, we hear a Library Love Story from Austinite Avani Chhaya.

Cars drive down East Seventh Street as the sun sets.
Julia Reihs / KUT

Austin is among 30 cities worldwide where emissions have peaked, according to a new analysis from a coalition of cities dedicated to reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

(The Fantastic) Kent Cummins has been doing magic for 70 years.
Julia Reihs / KUT

Earlier this year, KUT partnered with Austin's Library Foundation to gather your stories about what the public library means to you. We selected a few of the writers to come record their essays at KUT. Over the next few weeks, you'll hear more of those. 

Kent Cummins has been doing magic for 70 years. He got his start as a kid growing up in Del Rio, Texas.

The deadline to register to vote in the November 2019 election is Oct. 7.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Oct. 7 is the last day to register to vote in this November's local and state constitutional elections in Texas. It’s also the last day to update your address if you’ve moved since the last time you voted.  

Barton Springs Pool on Sept. 28, 2016.
Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / KUT

With unseasonably hot temperatures in Austin this fall, it’s a great time to take a swim in the city’s premier swimming hole.

Barton Springs Pool is a constant 70 degrees, more than cool enough to help you chill out no matter how hot it is outside. But that’s also chilly enough to make it kind of uncomfortable to get into at first. That led Susan Somers-Willett to ask our ATXplained project this question:

What’s the best way to enter the icy waters of Barton Springs?

LASA teacher David Walker looks out over the North Slope in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
Karl Romanowicz

The Arctic is warming faster than any other place on Earth. Twice as fast.

That’s not easy to grasp when you’re thousands of miles away. But over the summer, one Austin high school teacher went to see it firsthand.

Austin Fire Department

Update at 12:28 p.m. Sunday: The Austin Fire Department tweeted that the brush fire was 90% contained. Crews were continuing to monitor the scene.

KUT's Claire McInerny interviews Huston Tillotson alum John Mays and UT PhD Candidate Gina Tillis.
Julia Reihs / KUT

KUT made a commitment last year to track the diversity of the sources you hear on the air in our local news coverage. We’re analyzing the data to break down information based on gender, race/ethnicity and the expertise of those sources. We’re nearing a full year of tracking that data on a monthly basis.

Here’s the latest on what we’ve found.

Rob Rosenthal

Earlier this month, KUT hosted the Transom Traveling Workshop, a weeklong training program for up-and-coming audio producers from all over the country. It was the workshop's first time ever in Austin, and the 10 participants were given a simple task: profile an Austinite – any Austinite – who they thought were interesting.

We had a wide range of stories that came out of that assignment. Take a listen to each of the students' stories below.

Lifeguards Quinlin Taylor, left, and Katie Mallet
Michael Minasi for KUT

Many Austin pools close this weekend, ahead of school re-opening next week. But there are still a few more days to get in a swim at your neighborhood pool. And while you're there, maybe you'll hear what Madeline Fening hears when it's time for people to get out of the pool for a five-minute break:

Rob Rosenthal

This week, KUT is hosting the Transom Traveling Workshop, where 10 new radio producers learn everything they need to know about telling stories in sound. 

Each student will produce one audio story about an interesting person in our community. 

Be the first to hear these brand-new stories at a listening event Saturday at 6:30 p.m. in KUT's Studio 1A. We'll listen to the stories and hear from each of the producers about their experience making their first radio story. 

Some people are complaining about the appearance of the "crown" at the top of Austin's tallest building, The Independent.
Richie Loria / KUT

The Independent, at 301 West Ave. in downtown Austin, is the city's newest tallest building. Some call it the "Jenga tower" because of its jagged appearance – shapes jutting out from the sides of the building.

The 59-story luxury apartment tower is definitely attention-getting, and some eyes are drawn all the way to the top – to what looks from afar like a tennis court or one of those nets to stop golf balls at a driving range. 

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Priscila Vega came to the U.S. as a child from her native El Salvador. Her family fled that country's civil war.

She spent 21 years in the U.S. without documentation.

Now a teacher in Austin, Vega talks about voting for the first time and the need to give back.

We're highlighting the voices of people who came to the U.S. from another country in celebration of Immigrant Heritage Month. We want to hear your story! Tell us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram using #ATXImmigrants.

Julia Reihs / KUT

Diana Nguyen left her native Vietnam after her father was threatened with prison for serving in the South Vietnamese army.

She talks about encountering pirates in the Pacific Ocean, seeing snow for the first time and not taking anything for granted.

Ronald Muljadi came to the U.S. with his family at 5 years old.
Julia Reihs / KUT

Ronald Muljadi is a mortgage broker in Austin. He moved to the U.S. with his parents and sister when he was 5 years old. 

Growing up, he never felt like he got the "full experience" of his Indonesian heritage until he got older.

Ximena Cardoso-Sloane, originally from Ecuador
Julia Reihs / KUT

Ximena Cardoso-Sloane, a math teacher in Round Rock, never planned to move to the U.S. She left her native Ecuador in 2000 to visit a friend in America — and ended up staying.

"In my heart," she says, "I always was a citizen of the world."

"Mini murals" painted on traffic signal cabinets
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Four intersections around Austin are now home to murals by local artists. The city’s Artbox program worked with Houston-based UP Art Studio to commission artists to paint traffic signal cabinets — which hold the guts of stoplights — as the first round of “mini murals.”

Julia Reihs / KUT

Monica Caivano came to Austin from Argentina in 1994. She co-founded Esquina Tango, a "mini cultural center" that teaches language and dance in East Austin.

Julia Reihs / KUT

We're celebrating Immigrant Heritage Month by highlighting people who have moved to Austin from all over the world.

 

Anna Katrina Davey is originally from Italy, but spent time in Germany and Vietnam before moving to Austin. She owns a company that trains businesspeople to recognize and understand cultural differences with people they do business with in other countries.

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