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Science

It Won't Be A Total Eclipse In Austin, But It'll Still Be Awesome.

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NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Austin may not be in best spot to see the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, but there will be a show, nonetheless.

The visible path of the total eclipse runs diagonally across the U.S. from Oregon to South Carolina — well to our north — but we’ll still see about 65 percent of the sun obscured by the moon at its peak.

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Credit NASA

The eclipse will begin in Austin at around 11:41 a.m., reach its maximum at about 1:10 p.m. and then be completely over by 2:39 p.m.

Remember: Don’t look directly at the eclipse with your naked eyes! You can buy a pair of certified eclipse glasses (here’s a handy list from the American Astronomical Association) or you can make your own pinhole camera with these instructions from NASA.

NASA is livestreaming the event:

Several organizations around Austin are hosting viewing parties Aug. 21:

UT’s Astronomy Department
Austin Public Library’s Howson Branch
Bastrop State Park
Round Rock Public Library
Buda Public Library

We're on Facebook Live from the event at UT's Astronomy building:

The last time a total eclipse was viewable in the U.S. was 1923.

If you miss this year’s eclipse, don’t worry; there will be another one on April 8, 2024. Good news: Austin will be in the path of the total eclipse that time.

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