Dance

Julia Reihs / KUT

Monica Caivano came to Austin from Argentina in 1994. She co-founded Esquina Tango, a "mini cultural center" that teaches language and dance in East Austin.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Eli Hernandez started dancing when he was 5 years old. 

"I just like everything about dancing," he said last week at his dance team rehearsal. "There's always something else you can learn. Once you've mastered something, you've never really mastered it. You have to keep going." 

The latest challenge for the East Austin College Prep junior: dancing in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. 

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / KUT

Adrian Ortega stood back from the pool at the Austin Motel on South Congress Avenue looking uncertain.

“I have done nothing like this before,” said Ortega, a former Austin lifeguard who now oversees the city’s aquatics programs, including swim teams. “It’s totally outside of my comfort zone.”

Courtesy Ballet Austin

From Texas Standard:

Few parents put pen to paper to figure out how much they'll spend if their kids end up loving the activity they started at age three. For example, by the time your adorable toddler girl – who’s in love with ballet – graduates high school you will have spent as much as $100,000 on fees, tutus and training. That's according to an estimate by Dance USA.

If your daughter goes pro – her training could be as expensive as a doctor's. But ballet is not just for girls. Boys spend much less on a lifetime of ballet training.