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Life & Arts

The True Cost Of The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre With Charlene P. Corley

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On this edition of In Black America, producer/host John L. Hanson Jr. speaks with Charlene P. Corley, vice president of Diverse Insight & Partnership with Nielsen.

Tulsa's Greenwood District of 1921 was home to 10,000 African-American residents who created a thriving community and economy fueled by African-American business owners. It was also known as Black Wall Street. Unfortunately, you won’t find that same level of ownership among African-American Tulsans today.

Corley talks about how after the Tulsa race massacre, insurance companies refused to honor claims; how the devastating effects of that massacre are still felt in North Tulsa today; how African Americans still lag in home and business ownership compared with White residents; and how Tulsa’s African-American residents are almost twice as likely to be renters, compared with White residents.

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