Voting

Election signs at the corner of Manor and Airport.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The Texas Secretary of State’s office sent local election officials an advisory Thursday that was meant to give them guidance on how to handle elections during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The deadline to register to vote in the November 2019 election is Oct. 7.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

The Texas Democratic Party filed a lawsuit Friday aimed at increasing access to vote by mail as the coronavirus spreads in the state.

Election Officials Consider Reroute Of Senior Facility Voting

Mar 18, 2020
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon

From Texas Standard:

Seniors are often more vulnerable to diseases than other people. And that’s especially true when it comes to COVID-19. So when the Renaissance Retirement Center in Austin went into lockdown over the weekend, Maxine Barkan, who is 100 years old, thought it was a good idea.

“I think they’re doing an excellent job trying to keep us safe and trying to minimize the person-to-person contact,” she says.

M.J. Hegar, candidate for U.S. Senate, speaks at Democratic Party Headquarters in Austin on election night.
Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

It's Election Day in Texas for the March primaries.

Our reporters will be sharing updates on what they see and hear throughout the day here. Check back for updates.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

If you're from Austin, voting in a grocery store probably feels like a normal thing. But to those who are newer to town, it's unusual.

Salvador Castro for KUT

Voters under 40 have been largely ignored during the lead up to this year’s presidential primaries, according to a new poll released by the Tisch College of Civic Life at Tufts University.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Early voting in the 2020 Texas primaries runs from Feb. 18 until Feb. 28, and before you head to the polls, make sure you know your rights as a voter.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Texans will go to the polls today to vote in the state's primary elections. With 95% of eligible voters registered to vote in Travis County — a record number — it’s likely more people will be heading to the polls this year than in the last election.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

If you live in Travis County, here are all the races that might appear on your ballot for either the Democratic or Republican primary. Put your address into the tool below to find out which Congressional, state legislative and State Board of Education districts you're in, then scroll down to find the candidates in those races.

A sign telling people to vote.
Salvador Castro for KUT

Ahead of the primaries next month, officials say, more than 821,000 people are registered to vote in Travis County. The 95% registration rate is an all-time county record – one that will likely be broken before Election Day in November.

Voters line up to cast ballots at Austin Community College's Highland Campus in 2016.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Almost 80 percent of county election websites in Texas are not secure ahead of the 2020 presidential primary, according to a report from the League of Women Voters of Texas.

Former Austin Assistant City Manager Terrell Blodgett and others speak out against Texas' mobile voting ban.
Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

The Texas Secretary of State is being sued over a new law banning local governments from setting up temporary polling locations – or any polling location that isn’t open throughout all of early voting.

A "vote here" sign
Eddie Gaspar / The Texas Tribune

A federal appeals court has overturned a previous ruling that could have opened the door to online voter registration in Texas.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

Texans voted on 10 constitutional amendments this Election Day. The propositions ranged from prohibiting an income tax from ever being collected in the state to allowing law enforcement animals to stay with their handlers when they retire.

Julie Gilberg helps with voter registration
Andrea Garcia for KUT

If counted accurately, the 2020 U.S. census is expected to show a boom in Texas’ Latino population. That’s why groups in the state say they plan to focus their efforts on making sure Latinos here fill out the form and get counted.

Robin Jerstad for The Texas Tribune

Worried about the suppression of young voters in 2020, national and Texas Democrats are suing the state over a newly implemented election measure that’s triggered the shuttering of early voting places, including on college campuses, in various parts of the state.

Texas Republicans say the pledge of allegiance at the convention in Fort Worth in 2018.
Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Come next fall, there might not be a single person of color among Texas Republicans in the U.S. House. But that’s not top of mind for Gerard Garcia.

“Diversity is welcome, but when I vote I’m more focused on the politician’s positions,” he said.

A man stands at a voting machine
Julia Reihs / KUT

Travis County officials are letting voters try out the county's new voting system ahead of the November elections.

Crystal Mason
Leslie Boorhem-Stephenson for The Texas Tribune

FORT WORTH — When Crystal Mason got out of federal prison, she said, she “got out running.”

By Nov. 8, 2016, when she’d been out for months but was still on supervised release, she was working full-time at Santander Bank in downtown Dallas and enrolled in night classes at Ogle Beauty School, trying, she said, to show her children that a “bump in the road doesn’t determine your future.”

Voters line up to cast ballots
Salvador Castro for KUT

Younger Texans are less likely to view democracy positively and more likely to want to significantly and structurally change American government, according to a Texas Lyceum poll released today.

Julia Reihs / KUT

A new study says Texas' system of levying fines and fees to restore formerly incarcerated people's voting rights prevented nearly 333,000 people from voting in 2016.

June Conway helps Eric Hood register
Qiling Wang for KUT

Advocates say they're hoping to register more Texans with disabilities ahead of the constitutional amendment election in November and the presidential primaries next year.

Across the country, voter turnout among people with disabilities is lower than those without disabilities.

Illustration of black women being prevented from voting
Michelle Lam / Houston Public Media

In 1918, when she was 25 years old, Christia Adair went door-to-door organizing for women’s right to vote in Texas. 

“This effort was to pass a bill where women would be able to vote like men,” Adair remembered later in a 1977 oral history interview with the Schlesinger Library at Radcliffe College.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton
Julia Reihs / KUT

When former Secretary of State David Whitley launched a review of the Texas voter rolls for supposed noncitizens, his office marked almost 100,000 voters for two reviews — one by county officials to question their voter eligibility and another by the Texas attorney general's office for possible criminal prosecution.

Miguel Gutierrez Jr. / The Texas Tribune

Texas Secretary of State David Whitley, who was behind the botched effort to remove alleged noncitizens from the state’s voter rolls, reportedly resigned Monday as the 86th Legislature came to a close.

Juan Figueroa for KUT

County judges and voting groups say they're concerned an update to a sweeping voting bill could reduce the number of countywide polling places in minority communities – particularly in larger metropolitan areas in Texas.

Jorge Sanhueza-Lyon / KUT

Unlike other voting rights lawsuits filed against Texas officials in the past decade, the challenge to the state’s noncitizen voter-removal effort was settled relatively quickly.

Bob Daemmrich for The Texas Tribune

Three months after first questioning the citizenship status of almost 100,000 registered voters, the Texas secretary of state has agreed to end a review of the voter rolls for supposed noncitizens that was flawed from the start.

After high turnout in last year's midterm elections propelled Democrats to a new House majority and big gains in the states, several Republican-controlled state legislatures are attempting to change voting-related rules in ways that might reduce future voter turnout.

Gabriel C. Pérez / KUT

The state Senate passed legislation Monday that increases criminal penalties for election-related crimes in Texas. Voting rights groups have said they worry the bill could criminalize honest mistakes, among other things.

Pages